• Seraphine Dogbey

British-Ghanaian entrepreneur builds earbuds that can auto-translate 40 languages

All eyes have been on Danny Manu, a British- Ghanaian entrepreneur who recently developed real-time language translation earbuds that have gone viral.


The revolutionary invention is set to help bridge the language gap that hampers communication in everyday life.


Click enable users to converse efficiently in close to forty languages and allows them to call, text and read notifications from their devices.


Mymanu, the company that produces Click uses its one of a kind operating system to make all these possible. The OS even facilitates text-to-speech and speech-to-text.


Meanwhile, the company is looking to add African languages to the dozens of languages programmed for live translation on the CLIK+ and CLIK S earbuds which have been widely accepted in the US and European markets.




Although the adoption of the products in Africa has not been significant the company wants to take up the challenge from 2022.




The entrepreneur is also considering Ghana as a hub for a centre that will host a team of engineers to carry out the research and development on the creation.






In an interview on Accra based radio, Citi FM, he noted, “It is a very hard thing. It is a very complex process and so our objective is that next year as we dedicate a team of engineers to start R&D and African languages, we will actually have a location in Ghana to enable us to make that happen because we need to understand the language, know the different dialect accents to make that work, but it is one of our priorities”.


He admitted that the recent buzz around his innovation is very encouraging.


33-year-old Danny hopes to inspire other black entrepreneurs in Ghana and outside Ghana with his work and feats.


About Danny Manu


Danny is an engineer who was born in the United Kingdom to Ghanaian parents.


He studied at Oxford Brookes University and had previously worked at Quanta Networks Inc

and MEDYBIRD before establishing MyManu in 2014.


He has a background in music and earth and was recently recognised by Google for his contributions to science, arts and culture.




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